Covenant Transportation Group web photo 2

CTG enhanced its already strong service with safety and leadership initiatives.

By Alan Dorich

For more than 30 years, Covenant Transportation Group (CTG) Inc. has been guided by values such as perseverance, hard work, faith, humility, planning and talent management. “Those are the keys to [getting us] where we are today,” President Joey Hogan declares.

Based in Chattanooga, Tenn., the transportation and logistics services firm is a holding company for multiple business units with offerings that range from truckload and intermodal freight transportation to tractor/trailer sales and leasing. Founders David and Jacqueline Parker started CTG in 1986 with just 25 trucks.

Today, the company has 2,600 vehicles across its divisions, Hogan says. These include Covenant Transport, Southern Refrigerated Transport, Star Transportation, Covenant Transport Solutions, Transport Financial Solutions and Transport Enterprise Leasing.

INAP web photo 1

INAP used a phased approach to create buy-in as it shifted its procurement structure.

By Tim O’Connor

A successful supply chain transformation requires buy-in from the people executing its everyday functions. If a person in the field is unwilling to learn or follow the new processes and procedures the implementation can fall apart. Those employees must understand how those changes will improve their jobs before they are willing to go along.

For data center services company Internap Corp. (INAP), the pitch for its switch to a centralized procurement structure was straightforward: the change would take purchasing decisions out of the hands of the field agents and allow them to focus on providing technology solutions for customers. “I’d often tell them to think back at the job description when they applied for the job,” Senior Director of Procurement Adam Crowe says of explaining the change to field personnel. “I’m pretty sure ordering parts wasn’t one of the bullet points.”

Xerox Corp web photo 1

Xerox Corp. created efficiencies by more closely connecting its regional supply operations to its global network.

By Tim O’Connor

People don’t buy copiers and printers for the sake of having the equipment. Copiers and printers are a means to an end, a way to disseminate information among a team or to a client. In an increasingly digital age, these modes of communication are becoming more complex as communication that once took place in a single conference room now occurs all over the world.

To accommodate how modern business functions, Xerox has become a technology company focused as much on intelligent workspaces and cloud applications as it is on the broader printing market. “We’re a big player in an even bigger pool,” says Ken Syme, senior vice president of global manufacturing, supply chain and procurement at Xerox.

At the heart of Xerox’s technology is the interface between the digital and physical worlds. Customers want to convert their printed information into a digital format, distribute it to stakeholders and be able to interact with the material in a digital format. At the same time, paper documents are not going away anytime in the foreseeable future.

GTT Communications web photo

GTT Communications launches a new networking service with highly scalable bandwidth and low latency connectivity.

By Kat Zeman

As global demand for bandwidth grows, networking providers are scattering to upgrade the capacity of their existing cables and investing billions of dollars in newer and faster systems. 

According to data from TeleGeography’s Global Bandwidth Research Service, the demand for international bandwidth will have increased 13-fold between 2016 and 2023. McLean, Va.-based GTT Communications Inc. has already responded to this trend.

A leading global cloud networking provider to multinational clients, GTT recently launched a new product: Optical Transport services. “It provides highly scalable bandwidth and low latency connectivity,” says Michael Montreuil, director of supply chain and logistics for GTT. “Our data transmission is very fast.”

ValuePoint Solutions web photo

ValuePoint Solutions understands the importance of building relationships with customers to meet their needs and expectations.

By Bianca Herron

ValuePoint Solutions was founded to address a market need for an independent indirect material service provider not owned or affiliated with a manufacturer or distributor of the goods being managed. Nearly 20 years later, the Saginaw, Mich.-based company demonstrates the capabilities of providing MRO/Indirect Material integrator services to a variety of industries that include manufacturing, education, municipalities, healthcare, etc.

“As an integrator we provide four primary indirect/MRO services that include storeroom [crib]/warehouse management, inventory management, procurement and consulting in these key areas,” Business Development Manger Spence Webb says. “Our solutions range from complete all-inclusive offerings to individual services tailored to a client’s needs.”

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