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Utilizing lean principles, World Vision is streamlining its supply chain to reduce the time from donation to destination. By Tim O’Connor

As one of the largest humanitarian organizations, World Vision works in impoverished and disaster-stricken areas with limited and challenging transportation infrastructure. The lack of usable roads and scarcity of logistics solutions can hamper the organization’s ability to get supplies to the communities where they are needed most. In those cases, World Vision relies on its in-country staff to provide knowledge of local transportation networks and establish relationships with carriers in the region for the final mile delivery.

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Bristol-Myers Squibb turns procurement into a strategic function driving business performance and patient centricity. By Eric Slack

When Farryn Melton, a veteran procurement leader at pharma, aerospace and entertainment companies, became Bristol-Myers Squibb’s chief procurement officer in 2012, she saw a strong procurement organization with enormous potential to contribute even more value. She was eager to transform the leading BioPharma company’s procurement group to one that partnered strategically with the business functions and drove value – beyond savings – across the organization.
    Today, after a significant transformation aligned key roles with the right talent, and with new technologies and services, capability enhancements and mindset, the company’s procurement experts are teaming up more strategically with business leaders across the organization. Those leaders, who say they see noticeable improvements in their interactions, are integrating procurement specialists into their leadership teams to help them achieve their goals.

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Biogen is rethinking its procurement processes by relying on ‘45 second analytics’ to quickly select quality suppliers.

The idea of procurement elicits images of boxes moving on conveyor belts, trucks traveling interstate highways and  new supplies or equipment arriving at a warehouse. But for biotech firm Biogen, people are as important as any other resource the company procures. Each time Biogen brings a new medical therapy or drug to market the company needs to find patients willing to participate in a study of the treatment.
    If the company is conducting trials on a drug to treat Alzheimer’s it needs to find people who suffer from cognitive challenges, such as leaving their keys in the car or driving away and then forgetting where they are headed. To find those people, the company hires a supplier who recruits and supplies the people for the study.

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